Tag Archives: Creative Commons

This is what free/libre/open source is all about

This is what free software and free culture are all about: the process of invention, of taking existing things and using them in novel ways that the previous inventors never even dreamed of.

"Here we ask those what if questions, and we are free to imagine what the answers look like. We're encouraged to look around us at the things that exist and imagine how we could make them better, how we could take them to the next level, how we could transform them." -Naomi Novik
“Here we ask those what if questions, and we are free to imagine what the answers look like. We’re encouraged to look around us at the things that exist and imagine how we could make them better, how we could take them to the next level, how we could transform them.” -Naomi Novik

The Blender Foundation wants to make a Free movie.

The Blender Foundation has announced that they want to make a movie. They’re crowdfunding it with the hope of reaching €1.9 million (that’s $2.626 million US dollars calculated using DuckDuckGo). €1.6 million with their own resources, for a total of €3.5 million ($4.837 million). That’s the minimum amount they would need to make Project Gooseberry, as they’re currently calling it.

The best part is, this being the Blender Institute (makes of great shorts like Big Buck Bunny and Sintel), they’ll release everything Free under the Creative Commons Attribution license. In fact, they’ve already started doing that.

Misc. Filmmaking Tips and Resources

Anyone who’s read my previous post on this blog knows that I’m currently working on a short film based on Edgar Allen Poe’s ‘The Raven’. I thought I’d write this post to share some miscellaneous tips and ideas that I have found useful during the filmmaking process. They’re organized (very roughly) in order of when you will probably need them, earliest being first.

-The Idea/Script

Often, for me at least, the hardest step in the filmmaking process is the first step: coming up with a good film idea. I like to film, I get the urge to pick up a video camera, but I have no idea what to do with it. Here are a few solutions. Continue reading Misc. Filmmaking Tips and Resources

Amazon “Best of 2010” book released under Creative Commons license

I’m sure you’ve all heard of the book “Machine of Death“, right? I think I’d heard of it once before now. Anyway, for those who haven’t heard of it, it’s one of the best-selling sci-fi books on Amazon this year.

The book’s editors have announced that the book is now available on their web site for free under the Creative Commons BY-NC-ND license. I’m personally not a fan of the ‘no derivative works’ idea – I think that we should be free to create derivatives of any cultural work including books – but I respect these editors for specifically allowing people to download and share their book without limitation. Some of the stories in the book “are further released under the Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license, which also permits non-commercial adaptation of the work into other media.” Continue reading Amazon “Best of 2010” book released under Creative Commons license

Why I choose share-alike licenses

I’m not sure exactly how to start this blog post, so I guess I’ll just jump right in at some random point. (I hate not being able to think of a good introduction, because when you have a good introduction the rest of the post seems to just flow together to easily). I don’t like to be told what I can’t do with my culture. I don’t like being given a song and told I can’t sing it in public, or a photograph and told I can’t make a photocopy of it, or a story and told I can’t retell it. It seems to me that that is exactly what copyright systems are designed to do: limit what you can do, and somehow they do it in the name of ‘freedom’. This is not freedom.

Copyright doesn’t have to be that way, however. One fundamental feature of copyright is that creators are allowed to say “go ahead and do that”. Creators are allowed to say, if they want, “Feel free to ignore my copyrights.”. This is why I have decided to become a creator, not just a consumer. I can’t change what other people do with their copyrights, but at least I can choose what to do with mine. I give freedom to my consumers and fellow creators, and I hope that my fellow creators will be courteous enough to do the same for me. All I ask is that, if you take my work and use it, you give to everyone the same freedoms that I am giving to everyone.

Are you a consumer? Are you free? Am I free?