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Repost: Best Response To A Copyright Threat Ever? Lawyers Explain Why ABA Is Full Of S**t In Claiming Copyright On Routing Numbers

This is a repost from TechDirt. It was so funny I just had to share it. Obviously my normal Creative Commons copyright license doesn’t apply here, since this post isn’t mine.

Best Response To A Copyright Threat Ever? Lawyers Explain Why ABA Is Full Of S**t In Claiming Copyright On Routing Numbers (via Techdirt)

In our time we’ve seen some pretty epic responses to bogus legal threats, but it appears we have a new contender for the throne. As a whole bunch of lawyers suddenly emailed me this morning, it appears there’s been a followup to our earlier story on…

Continue reading Repost: Best Response To A Copyright Threat Ever? Lawyers Explain Why ABA Is Full Of S**t In Claiming Copyright On Routing Numbers

Posted to YouTube, flagged for copyright violation

So I’ve finally finished work on ‘The Raven’, the short film I’ve been working on. I posted it to YouTube yesterday and the Internet Archive today. The YouTube copy has already been flagged by a bot for copyright violation.

Specifically, it’s about the music. I used a public domain recording (downloaded from MusOpen.org, which “requires all users who upload music to the site to represent that the uploaded musical composition and/or the sound recording is in the public domain“) of what I believe to be a public domain composition (Night on Bald Mountain). NoBM has had a complicated history, with multiple arrangements made by different people. Wikipedia says there were some arrangements made by Leopold Stokowski which might still be copyrighted because they are from 1940 and later, but says “The Stokowski arrangements are only rarely heard today, Rimsky-Korsakov’s orchestration being the concert favorite, and the one most often programmed.”. The same article says that the Rimsky-Korsakov arrangement was “completed in 1886, and was published in the same year…”, which would make it ineligible for copyright protection here in the United States. I therefore believe that the music used in my film is entirely free from copyright, and therefore I have the right to use it as I wish. Continue reading Posted to YouTube, flagged for copyright violation

So Ubuntu 11.04 gets released tomorrow

I’ve been running Ubuntu Natty, a.k.a. 11.04, since it was in its alpha development stage. I like using cutting-edge programs, and the underlying operating system, GNU/Linux, is stable enough that I can trust it even if it’s called an alpha.

I don’t particularly like the new Unity interface, which was previously only used in Ubuntu Netbook Remix. I do think that switching to Unity is a good choice for Ubuntu, because Unity looks to me like it will be easier for new users to learn than the old GNOME 2 interface was, but so many features I like have been removed or changed, and so many new features that I don’t personally use added, that a relative power user like me would be more satisfied with XFCE or LXDE. This is one of the reasons why I switched to LXDE. Continue reading So Ubuntu 11.04 gets released tomorrow

Amazon “Best of 2010” book released under Creative Commons license

I’m sure you’ve all heard of the book “Machine of Death“, right? I think I’d heard of it once before now. Anyway, for those who haven’t heard of it, it’s one of the best-selling sci-fi books on Amazon this year.

The book’s editors have announced that the book is now available on their web site for free under the Creative Commons BY-NC-ND license. I’m personally not a fan of the ‘no derivative works’ idea – I think that we should be free to create derivatives of any cultural work including books – but I respect these editors for specifically allowing people to download and share their book without limitation. Some of the stories in the book “are further released under the Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license, which also permits non-commercial adaptation of the work into other media.” Continue reading Amazon “Best of 2010” book released under Creative Commons license

An ebook publisher that doesn’t insist on DRM!

I know this article is dated 29 October, but I just found out about it. Great news! Springer apparently publishes new books, not just old public domain works like Project Gutenberg does. The bad news is, the publisher actually wanted to include DRM originally; the reason they decided not to use it was because their “institutional customers” said no. “Our policy is to give our customers whatever they want.”

Here’s the article on the Publishers Weekly web site. (Google cached copy here.)

News Article: Free Technology Academy and Free Software Foundation Partner to Expand Access to Master’s Program in Free Software

This article has just been released by the Free Software Foundation and the Free Technology Academy. No copyright license is specified, but I think it’s safe to assume that it can be copied and redistributed without modification.

Copied from here. Continue reading News Article: Free Technology Academy and Free Software Foundation Partner to Expand Access to Master’s Program in Free Software